Go here http://theprojekt.artsprojekt.com

Dec 15
Artist Proof Interview with Artist: James Adams 
Global Location: Fort Collins, CO
URL:  www.ArtOfJamesAdams.com 
AP Shop URL: http://www.zazzle.com/artofjamesadams*
James Adams (b.1969)
US artist James C. Adams was born and raised in Temple, Texas, and currently resides in Fort Collins, Colorado.
Specializing in Goth inspired illustrations, his artwork mainly focuses on the female form, portrayed in a variety of goth fantasy roles. From dedications to the goddess in all things to exploration in the sensual, sexy nature of the female spirit. 
His drawings come to life with bite and snarl - an artist that creates it like he sees it, female empowerment outside the confinement of labels.
AP: How long have you been making art for and what lead you to start.
JA:  I’ve been drawing for as long as I can remember. It was my interest in my mom’s lingerie catalogs that stirred my interest. I saw a drawing of a female in a bra and I was consumed to draw it, over and over again until I got it right. To this day, I don’t know who the artist was, but it was a fabulous drawing as an ad in the back of the woman’s mag.

AP: Where do you currently  live and work ω And how does this influence your work.
JA: I live in Fort Collins, CO. The art community here is very good. However, my genre doesn’t fit well in the contemporary sense. There’s a huge tattoo interest here. So, a lot of people who like that style, also like my work as well.

AP: Did you have formal training if so whatω If your self taught can you tell us what you prefer about being a self taught artist vs having formal training.
JA: I went to the Art Institute of Colorado. I graduated with honors in 1996 in Visual Communications. I studied graphic design and went to work at a TV station in Denver as an Online Graphic Artist. Things didn’t go as smoothly as I had thought they would. I later did graphic design work for a Parks and Recreation in Littleton, CO. That didn’t pan well, either. So, I decided the only kind of art I wanted to do was illustration. It took 10 years of side jobs, caricatures, etc. to figure out what I really wanted to do art-wise. I love goth fantasy pinup illustration. So, you can say that I was really self taught, in the sense that all my formal training was computer-based graphics, logo design, brochure work, etc. No one showed me how to draw. It’s just something I’ve picked up along the way. And, that’s why my style is so unique compared to mainstream pinup artists of the day.

AP: Can you tell us about where you make your work is it in your house, a studio etc.. and how it effects your work.
JA: I draw wherever I can. When I’m at work, I draw on my breaks. When I am at home, I usually make camp at the dining room table and do most of my painting there. I would love to have a studio or designated work space. I think it would greatly improve my skills. But for now, I have to work with what I’ve got.

AP: What are some of you favorite design projects/exhibitions you have worked on to date.
JA: I’ve never had the opportunity to participate in design projects/exhibitions.

AP: What is your medium of choice.
JA: Pencil, pen, water-down Speedball Acrylic Ink on Bristol.

AP: What is the relationship between technique and content in your work.
JA: I don’t focus on technique. It’s all about an idea that I will get in my head and I try my best to translate it onto the page.

AP: Who are some of the  artists that have inspired you and or your work.
JA: Frank Frazetta, Luis Royo, Hajime Sorayama,OliviaDe Berardinis, VictoriaFrances , Paul Calle and Walter Girotto

AP: In what direction would you like to see your work going over the next five years.
JA: I would love to see my work oversees, in Europe. I what to explore more into the realm of dark, seductive goth. I would love to see my work gain a wider online audience. And, eventually it would be nice to see my work hanging in a downtown gallery. That would be exciting. I would love to collaborate with other artists in my genre and learn from them. Gaining feedback is a very valuable tool to use in the evolution of ones work.

AP: What forth coming projects and or exhibitions do you have scheduled for 2011.
JA: I’m focused on artwork for www.pspasylum.com. I would love to do another art-book or a calender. But, I really haven’t planned anything too extravagant for the rest of this year. I’m really hopeful I might do a years-end art-book to showcase the best of 2011.

AP: Take us on a guided tour through a day in your life as an artist.
JA: Get up. Fix and eat breakfast. See my wife off to work. Go workout for 35 minutes. 2 hours of online promotional work of zazzle products, artwork and PSPtubes on Facebook, WordPress, Twitter, AIM and update www.artofjamesadams.com. Go to work. Draw on my breaks. Come home. Workout for 30 minutes. Draw/paint for 1-2 hours. Shower. Go to bed. Repeat.

AP: Thank you so much for taking the time to answer our questions.

Artist Proof Interview with Artist: James Adams 

Global Location: Fort Collins, CO

URL:  www.ArtOfJamesAdams.com 

AP Shop URL: http://www.zazzle.com/artofjamesadams*

James Adams (b.1969)

US artist James C. Adams was born and raised in Temple, Texas, and currently resides in Fort Collins, Colorado.

Specializing in Goth inspired illustrations, his artwork mainly focuses on the female form, portrayed in a variety of goth fantasy roles. From dedications to the goddess in all things to exploration in the sensual, sexy nature of the female spirit. 

His drawings come to life with bite and snarl - an artist that creates it like he sees it, female empowerment outside the confinement of labels.

AP: How long have you been making art for and what lead you to start.

JA:  I’ve been drawing for as long as I can remember. It was my interest in my mom’s lingerie catalogs that stirred my interest. I saw a drawing of a female in a bra and I was consumed to draw it, over and over again until I got it right. To this day, I don’t know who the artist was, but it was a fabulous drawing as an ad in the back of the woman’s mag.

Unknown-3

AP: Where do you currently  live and work ω And how does this influence your work.

JA: I live in Fort Collins, CO. The art community here is very good. However, my genre doesn’t fit well in the contemporary sense. There’s a huge tattoo interest here. So, a lot of people who like that style, also like my work as well.

Unknown-10

AP: Did you have formal training if so whatω If your self taught can you tell us what you prefer about being a self taught artist vs having formal training.

JA: I went to the Art Institute of Colorado. I graduated with honors in 1996 in Visual Communications. I studied graphic design and went to work at a TV station in Denver as an Online Graphic Artist. Things didn’t go as smoothly as I had thought they would. I later did graphic design work for a Parks and Recreation in Littleton, CO. That didn’t pan well, either. So, I decided the only kind of art I wanted to do was illustration. It took 10 years of side jobs, caricatures, etc. to figure out what I really wanted to do art-wise. I love goth fantasy pinup illustration. So, you can say that I was really self taught, in the sense that all my formal training was computer-based graphics, logo design, brochure work, etc. No one showed me how to draw. It’s just something I’ve picked up along the way. And, that’s why my style is so unique compared to mainstream pinup artists of the day.

Unknown-9

AP: Can you tell us about where you make your work is it in your house, a studio etc.. and how it effects your work.

JA: I draw wherever I can. When I’m at work, I draw on my breaks. When I am at home, I usually make camp at the dining room table and do most of my painting there. I would love to have a studio or designated work space. I think it would greatly improve my skills. But for now, I have to work with what I’ve got.

Unknown-8

AP: What are some of you favorite design projects/exhibitions you have worked on to date.

JA: I’ve never had the opportunity to participate in design projects/exhibitions.

Unknown-6

AP: What is your medium of choice.

JA: Pencil, pen, water-down Speedball Acrylic Ink on Bristol.

Unknown-5

AP: What is the relationship between technique and content in your work.

JA: I don’t focus on technique. It’s all about an idea that I will get in my head and I try my best to translate it onto the page.

Unknown-4

AP: Who are some of the  artists that have inspired you and or your work.

JA: Frank FrazettaLuis RoyoHajime Sorayama,OliviaDe BerardinisVictoriaFrances , Paul Calle and Walter Girotto

ja

AP: In what direction would you like to see your work going over the next five years.

JA: I would love to see my work oversees, in Europe. I what to explore more into the realm of dark, seductive goth. I would love to see my work gain a wider online audience. And, eventually it would be nice to see my work hanging in a downtown gallery. That would be exciting. I would love to collaborate with other artists in my genre and learn from them. Gaining feedback is a very valuable tool to use in the evolution of ones work.

Unknown

AP: What forth coming projects and or exhibitions do you have scheduled for 2011.

JA: I’m focused on artwork for www.pspasylum.com. I would love to do another art-book or a calender. But, I really haven’t planned anything too extravagant for the rest of this year. I’m really hopeful I might do a years-end art-book to showcase the best of 2011.

Unknown-1

AP: Take us on a guided tour through a day in your life as an artist.

JA: Get up. Fix and eat breakfast. See my wife off to work. Go workout for 35 minutes. 2 hours of online promotional work of zazzle products, artwork and PSPtubes on Facebook, WordPress, Twitter, AIM and update www.artofjamesadams.com. Go to work. Draw on my breaks. Come home. Workout for 30 minutes. Draw/paint for 1-2 hours. Shower. Go to bed. Repeat.

Unknown-2

AP: Thank you so much for taking the time to answer our questions.


Dec 7
Artist Proof Interview with Artist:  Luis Diaz
Global Location: Miami, FL USA
URL:  http://ldiaz.com
AP Shop URL:  http://www.zazzle.com/luisdiazart
Diaz worked as an illustrator and graphic designer for television, print, video games and other interactive media for more than 10 years. He has won acclaim from ImagineFX and CITY LINK Magazine, and created over 40 paintings for the new Garbage Pail Kids and Wacky Packages. A graduate of The Maryland Institute, College of Art (MICA). 

AP: How long have you been making art for and what lead you to start.
LD: I always drawn as a kid and loved collecting comic books and trading cards.  I was always fascinated by the nature of printed things.  I dreamed of having my artwork printed in trading cards, magazines and books.  That is what led me to painting and illustrating.

AP: Where do you currently  live and work ω And how does this influence your work.
LD: I live in a large city that excels in making stars and breaking them.  It’s a hard place to live with all the new trends and your 5 “seconds” of fame.

AP: Did you have formal training if so whatω If your self taught can you tell us what you prefer about being a self taught artist vs having formal training.
LD: I think all artists that go to school were self taught initially, but some decided to go to school.  I think its very daring to go to art school and really not knowing if the education you receive will benefit you at the end.  It was a good experience, but I learned more about myself as a person than as an artist.  I went away to school as a kid and came back as a man.  I learned to paint after school.

AP: Can you tell us about where you make your work is it in your house, a studio etc.. and how it effects your work.
LD: I change every year or so it seems.  I was in two studios this year and recently moved to a big house.  I get easily distracted by noises and people wondering around so I needed to work from home.  So I now share my home studio with my girlfriend Liza Sylvestre who is an amazing artist herself.  I have learned so much from working along side her.  I recommend artists to work with other artists as long as they help your creative process.  

AP: What are some of you favorite design projects/exhibitions you have worked on to date.
LD: I had an illustration show last year that really opened my mind to what I can do as an artist.  I created a piece of artwork that was 18 feet across by 5 feet and it was nothing, but words about how the economy has affected me as an artist.  I received a lot of attention from fellow artists and people who were touched by what I wrote.  I also sold the piece to a big art collector in Downtown Miami.  One of the best experiences I have had to date.

AP: What is your medium of choice.
LD: I like everything.  I love ink, drawing, painting both traditional and on the mac.  I think drawing is just the easiest form of communicating thoughts so if I had to say one that would be it.

AP: What is the relationship between technique and content in your work.
LD: I focus on content.  On story.  On narration.  Those are number one.  Technique is just the style you choose to express the idea.  The style is like the exterior of an automobile.  The idea is the spark in the engine.  Without it.  It can’t run.

AP: Who are some of the  artists that have inspired you and or your work.
LD:It’s hard.  Over the course of my career I can spot many artists or inspirations that made me want to go down this path.  I love Garbage Pail Kids so that was one of the firsts.  In high school it was comic books with monsters. and later Simon Bisley and Brom were the dagger that drove it home.

AP: In what direction would you like to see your work going over the next five years.
LD: I think I haven’t explored any general focus in my art mostly because I became an illustrator.  What I realized later was that I am really a fine artist.  I suck at deadlines and dealing with clients.  I am more of a painter and idea maker.  I want to explore those things that have been sitting in my head for ages.  I still have yet opened that door.

AP: What forth coming projects and or exhibitions do you have scheduled for 2012.
LD: I decided to tackle one of my first loves so I’m going back to the hear of story telling: comic books.  I plan to make some interesting stories next year with my comic book partner, Ricardo Porven.

AP: Take us on a guided tour through a day in your life as an artist.
LD: I wake up before noon, check my emails and eat breakfast/lunch.  I walk my dog, Bubba to the park by my house.  Most times I sketch in bench for about an hour.  I don’t get a chance to do lot of my own stuff when I do illustration assignments so drawing in my sketch book keeps me sane.  After that I begin my day working on illustrations and commissions.  When it’s evening I pick up my girlfriend from work and we eat dinner.  We watch an hour of a movie or show and then both of us get to work on some art until 2 or 3 in the morning.  Most often than a not I stay up until 6am and then go to sleep.  Rinse and repeat.

AP: Thank you so much for taking the time to answer our questions.
No problem.

Artist Proof Interview with Artist:  Luis Diaz

Global Location: Miami, FL USA

URL:  http://ldiaz.com

AP Shop URL:  http://www.zazzle.com/luisdiazart

Diaz worked as an illustrator and graphic designer for television, print, video games and other interactive media for more than 10 years. He has won acclaim from ImagineFX and CITY LINK Magazine, and created over 40 paintings for the new Garbage Pail Kids and Wacky Packages. A graduate of The Maryland Institute, College of Art (MICA). 

Luis Diaz19

AP: How long have you been making art for and what lead you to start.

LD: I always drawn as a kid and loved collecting comic books and trading cards.  I was always fascinated by the nature of printed things.  I dreamed of having my artwork printed in trading cards, magazines and books.  That is what led me to painting and illustrating.

Luis Diaz4

AP: Where do you currently  live and work ω And how does this influence your work.

LD: I live in a large city that excels in making stars and breaking them.  It’s a hard place to live with all the new trends and your 5 “seconds” of fame.

Luis Diaz2

AP: Did you have formal training if so whatω If your self taught can you tell us what you prefer about being a self taught artist vs having formal training.

LD: I think all artists that go to school were self taught initially, but some decided to go to school.  I think its very daring to go to art school and really not knowing if the education you receive will benefit you at the end.  It was a good experience, but I learned more about myself as a person than as an artist.  I went away to school as a kid and came back as a man.  I learned to paint after school.

Luis Diaz5

AP: Can you tell us about where you make your work is it in your house, a studio etc.. and how it effects your work.

LD: I change every year or so it seems.  I was in two studios this year and recently moved to a big house.  I get easily distracted by noises and people wondering around so I needed to work from home.  So I now share my home studio with my girlfriend Liza Sylvestre who is an amazing artist herself.  I have learned so much from working along side her.  I recommend artists to work with other artists as long as they help your creative process.  

Luis Diaz8

AP: What are some of you favorite design projects/exhibitions you have worked on to date.

LD: I had an illustration show last year that really opened my mind to what I can do as an artist.  I created a piece of artwork that was 18 feet across by 5 feet and it was nothing, but words about how the economy has affected me as an artist.  I received a lot of attention from fellow artists and people who were touched by what I wrote.  I also sold the piece to a big art collector in Downtown Miami.  One of the best experiences I have had to date.

Luis Diaz9

AP: What is your medium of choice.

LD: I like everything.  I love ink, drawing, painting both traditional and on the mac.  I think drawing is just the easiest form of communicating thoughts so if I had to say one that would be it.

Luis Diaz13

AP: What is the relationship between technique and content in your work.

LD: I focus on content.  On story.  On narration.  Those are number one.  Technique is just the style you choose to express the idea.  The style is like the exterior of an automobile.  The idea is the spark in the engine.  Without it.  It can’t run.

UnknLuis Diaz6

AP: Who are some of the  artists that have inspired you and or your work.

LD:It’s hard.  Over the course of my career I can spot many artists or inspirations that made me want to go down this path.  I love Garbage Pail Kids so that was one of the firsts.  In high school it was comic books with monsters. and later Simon Bisley and Brom were the dagger that drove it home.

Luis Diaz10

AP: In what direction would you like to see your work going over the next five years.

LD: I think I haven’t explored any general focus in my art mostly because I became an illustrator.  What I realized later was that I am really a fine artist.  I suck at deadlines and dealing with clients.  I am more of a painter and idea maker.  I want to explore those things that have been sitting in my head for ages.  I still have yet opened that door.

Luis Diaz16

AP: What forth coming projects and or exhibitions do you have scheduled for 2012.

LD: I decided to tackle one of my first loves so I’m going back to the hear of story telling: comic books.  I plan to make some interesting stories next year with my comic book partner, Ricardo Porven.

Luis Diaz20

AP: Take us on a guided tour through a day in your life as an artist.

LD: I wake up before noon, check my emails and eat breakfast/lunch.  I walk my dog, Bubba to the park by my house.  Most times I sketch in bench for about an hour.  I don’t get a chance to do lot of my own stuff when I do illustration assignments so drawing in my sketch book keeps me sane.  After that I begin my day working on illustrations and commissions.  When it’s evening I pick up my girlfriend from work and we eat dinner.  We watch an hour of a movie or show and then both of us get to work on some art until 2 or 3 in the morning.  Most often than a not I stay up until 6am and then go to sleep.  Rinse and repeat.

Luis Diaz7

AP: Thank you so much for taking the time to answer our questions.

No problem.


Nov 23
Artist Proof Interview with Artist: Mark M. Mellon  
Global Location: Las Vegas, NV, US 
URL:   www.mellonfineart.com 
AP Shop URL: http://www.zazzle.com/MarkMellon
Mark M. Mellon has been painting and creating artwork since 1996.  After leaving school in 1998, he decided that learning the disciplines of being an artist worked best when it was self taught. He studied and learned through using books, information online and learning from local artists, writers and philosophers.   Not only about art and it’s history, but also immersing himself into independent study of philosophy, psychology, mythology as well as just simply trying to live life as a human.  Working in various and media, his work reflects surrealistic, abstract and expressionistic values with a presence all it’s own. The artist has shown in Nevada and California in group and solo exhibitions through out his career. He is currently working and residing in Las Vegas, NV.

AP: How long have you been making art for and what lead you to start.
MM: I have been creating for as long as i can remember. There have always been stories i would make up in my head for that to me were more real than reality it self. Life always seemed to me not what it was supposed to be, like something was missing (or hidden), so by creating my own alternative story line to it just made sense… Eventually I started drawing characters for this new world. Eventually I discovered the world of fine art, painting and all else that art was. This began my fascination with being an artist and to know for sure that is who/what i was, an artist.  

AP: Where do you currently  live and work ω And how does this influence your work.
MM:Currently I am living in Las Vegas, NV with my fiancé and my daughter. I moved here about 15 years ago, with my family from Pittsburgh, PA. I have asked myself the question of ‘How does this place influence me..?’ a lot. And I honestly have never came up with a definitive answer. I do not paint or portray the casino life, I do not represent the night life, in actuality my work has nothing to do with this city at all. I have left this city several times, always finding myself back. There is something about this place, not the city but the location I feel I like and that is why it has been considered home. Perhaps it is the fake-ness of the city it self, or the fact that man built a city in a location that is not even habitable to itself. Drives out to the mountain areas, the desert or the dried lake beds are time of centering your mind and finding peace from the quiet and the calmness of these areas. These moments are what I have found inspires a lot of what I do.

AP: Did you have formal training if so whatω If your self taught can you tell us what you prefer about being a self taught artist vs having formal training.
MM: I did not go to art school. I was planning on attending school in New York, but when I received my acceptance letter, I decided that was not the path. There are times I wish I did go, perhaps for the networking or the connection with your contemporaries, but those times are short lived. I do not regret my decision. I believe life itself can be the only teacher for art and if you are genuine and are disciplined enough to learn and grow with art skill on your own then there really is no need to have those giant bills of school that you will probably never pay off. Being independent has more rewards in my opinion. You become your own person, rather than what your peer or your instructors mold you to be.  

AP: Can you tell us about where you make your work is it in your house, a studio etc.. and how it effects your work.
MM: I have had several studios in the last few years. One place my work was outside and I actually enjoyed that, slightly. Was more organic. Another studio I had a while ago, I converted my entire apartment into a studio…And  even rented and lived in a studio in our arts district here in LV, but out of those where I had lots of room I created hardly next to nothing… Another studio I had where I actually was able to work was small, working on larger pieces or even paintings were just out of the question..  In that studio I began work on my watercolor series and this is where I began to find the voice and style I had been searching for. For a long time I hated that small room, but it gave birth to who I was.  Where I am at now is good, it is the best of both worlds in my opinion. I have made room in our garage to work. It is set up where I can work freely and just completely zone out. I think the best studios are not ones you force to be the best possible studio, but the least likely suspects. 

AP: What are some of you favorite design projects/exhibitions you have worked on to date.
MM: Well, that is tricky. I love almost every project I do. If i don’t, I destroy it and start over. My pen and ink series of abstract drawing of satellite images of the city has been a favorite of mine, and also a new series on canvas I am working on for my upcoming solo show inJanuary of 2012. 
The last group show I was involved in was probably my favorite of all I have done over the years, exhibited @ Twelve 21 Gallery here in vegas, it was a chance to take charge and really be more involved with the show and gallery, not to mention work with other artists whose work I respect. 

AP: What is your medium of choice.
MM: Acrylic and oil pastel… Pen and Ink…. Watercolor…. whatever gets the ideas out. 

AP: What is the relationship between technique and content in your work.
MM: The content could not be there with out the technique. I think we as artists strive forever to find that perfect balance and to find that perfect blend of techniques that create who you are and what your pieces can be remembered for. 
Technique and content I would say are like the Yin and the Yang. 

AP: Who are some of the  artists that have inspired you and or your work.
MM: All of them. There are too many, really. And honestly, about 5 years ago I decided to stop studying all these artists that I loved. I felt it was just getting in the way of myself becoming the artist who I was meant to be.  I have great respect for many artists with whom made my work what it is. But the artists that I love the most have/had great ideals and great philosophies behind their work and behind themselves. 

AP: In what direction would you like to see your work going over the next five years.
MM: I am working hard to find myself in more galleries and find new audiences. I would like to see my work recognized internationally and be that inspiration to younger artists in the next generations. 

AP: What forth coming projects and or exhibitions do you have scheduled for 2011.
MM: I am in a couple group shows of this year, one @ Twelve 21 Gallery and another at Black Bird Studios Gallery. 
I am gearing up for a solo show in January at Black Bird Studios Gallery. 

AP: Take us on a guided tour through a day in your life as an artist.
MM: Rinse. Pour. Repeat. 

AP: Thank you so much for taking the time to answer our questions.

Artist Proof Interview with Artist: Mark M. Mellon  

Global Location: Las Vegas, NV, US 

URL:   www.mellonfineart.com 

AP Shop URL: http://www.zazzle.com/MarkMellon

Mark M. Mellon has been painting and creating artwork since 1996.  After leaving school in 1998, he decided that learning the disciplines of being an artist worked best when it was self taught. He studied and learned through using books, information online and learning from local artists, writers and philosophers.   Not only about art and it’s history, but also immersing himself into independent study of philosophy, psychology, mythology as well as just simply trying to live life as a human.  Working in various and media, his work reflects surrealistic, abstract and expressionistic values with a presence all it’s own. The artist has shown in Nevada and California in group and solo exhibitions through out his career. He is currently working and residing in Las Vegas, NV.

understandingthesimplicityofthingsweb

AP: How long have you been making art for and what lead you to start.

MM: I have been creating for as long as i can remember. There have always been stories i would make up in my head for that to me were more real than reality it self. Life always seemed to me not what it was supposed to be, like something was missing (or hidden), so by creating my own alternative story line to it just made sense… Eventually I started drawing characters for this new world. Eventually I discovered the world of fine art, painting and all else that art was. This began my fascination with being an artist and to know for sure that is who/what i was, an artist.  

studio5

AP: Where do you currently  live and work ω And how does this influence your work.

MM:Currently I am living in Las Vegas, NV with my fiancé and my daughter. I moved here about 15 years ago, with my family from Pittsburgh, PA. I have asked myself the question of ‘How does this place influence me..?’ a lot. And I honestly have never came up with a definitive answer. I do not paint or portray the casino life, I do not represent the night life, in actuality my work has nothing to do with this city at all. I have left this city several times, always finding myself back. There is something about this place, not the city but the location I feel I like and that is why it has been considered home. Perhaps it is the fake-ness of the city it self, or the fact that man built a city in a location that is not even habitable to itself. Drives out to the mountain areas, the desert or the dried lake beds are time of centering your mind and finding peace from the quiet and the calmness of these areas. These moments are what I have found inspires a lot of what I do.

smallbitsoftheuniverse

AP: Did you have formal training if so whatω If your self taught can you tell us what you prefer about being a self taught artist vs having formal training.

MM: I did not go to art school. I was planning on attending school in New York, but when I received my acceptance letter, I decided that was not the path. There are times I wish I did go, perhaps for the networking or the connection with your contemporaries, but those times are short lived. I do not regret my decision. I believe life itself can be the only teacher for art and if you are genuine and are disciplined enough to learn and grow with art skill on your own then there really is no need to have those giant bills of school that you will probably never pay off. Being independent has more rewards in my opinion. You become your own person, rather than what your peer or your instructors mold you to be.  

studio2

AP: Can you tell us about where you make your work is it in your house, a studio etc.. and how it effects your work.

MM: I have had several studios in the last few years. One place my work was outside and I actually enjoyed that, slightly. Was more organic. Another studio I had a while ago, I converted my entire apartment into a studio…And  even rented and lived in a studio in our arts district here in LV, but out of those where I had lots of room I created hardly next to nothing… Another studio I had where I actually was able to work was small, working on larger pieces or even paintings were just out of the question..  In that studio I began work on my watercolor series and this is where I began to find the voice and style I had been searching for. For a long time I hated that small room, but it gave birth to who I was.  Where I am at now is good, it is the best of both worlds in my opinion. I have made room in our garage to work. It is set up where I can work freely and just completely zone out. I think the best studios are not ones you force to be the best possible studio, but the least likely suspects. 

studio1

AP: What are some of you favorite design projects/exhibitions you have worked on to date.

MM: Well, that is tricky. I love almost every project I do. If i don’t, I destroy it and start over. My pen and ink series of abstract drawing of satellite images of the city has been a favorite of mine, and also a new series on canvas I am working on for my upcoming solo show inJanuary of 2012. 

The last group show I was involved in was probably my favorite of all I have done over the years, exhibited @ Twelve 21 Gallery here in vegas, it was a chance to take charge and really be more involved with the show and gallery, not to mention work with other artists whose work I respect. 

debateoverthesacrificeofinnocence

AP: What is your medium of choice.

MM: Acrylic and oil pastel… Pen and Ink…. Watercolor…. whatever gets the ideas out. 

mmellon

AP: What is the relationship between technique and content in your work.

MM: The content could not be there with out the technique. I think we as artists strive forever to find that perfect balance and to find that perfect blend of techniques that create who you are and what your pieces can be remembered for. 

Technique and content I would say are like the Yin and the Yang. 

exilefromtheshoreofreason

AP: Who are some of the  artists that have inspired you and or your work.

MM: All of them. There are too many, really. And honestly, about 5 years ago I decided to stop studying all these artists that I loved. I felt it was just getting in the way of myself becoming the artist who I was meant to be.  I have great respect for many artists with whom made my work what it is. But the artists that I love the most have/had great ideals and great philosophies behind their work and behind themselves. 

studio6

AP: In what direction would you like to see your work going over the next five years.

MM: I am working hard to find myself in more galleries and find new audiences. I would like to see my work recognized internationally and be that inspiration to younger artists in the next generations. 

watchers_attempt

AP: What forth coming projects and or exhibitions do you have scheduled for 2011.

MM: I am in a couple group shows of this year, one @ Twelve 21 Gallery and another at Black Bird Studios Gallery. 

I am gearing up for a solo show in January at Black Bird Studios Gallery. 

studio3

AP: Take us on a guided tour through a day in your life as an artist.

MM: Rinse. Pour. Repeat. 

studio4

AP: Thank you so much for taking the time to answer our questions.


Nov 16
Artist Proof Interview with Artist: Sona Babajanyan 
Global Location: Brisbane, Australia
URL:  http://www.sonasart.com
AP Shop URL: http://www.zazzle.com/sonash/
Sona is a self-taught graphic artist and illustrator from Armenia, currently living in Brisbane, Australia. She has been working as a translator of literature, editor, and graphic designer, and it was not until 2008, when she finally decided to focus all her attention on art and illustration.  Sona’s works are full of subtle humor, poetry and magic. Many of her works are held in private collections in Europe and the US. She works both in traditional and digital media, showing exclusively individual style both in color and black and white. 


AP: How long have you been making art for and what lead you to start.
SB:  I have been drawing and painting since I can remember myself. I grew up in a very creative and art-loving family, and my parents encouraged all my “artistic endeavors” to the extent that at the age of 5 I was allowed to paint all the walls of our living room with gouache. I still remember those big bright flowers that stayed there for quite a while, filling myself with a sense of my own greatness. Wish I could bring some of that feeling back!

AP: Where do you currently live and work and how does this influence your work.
SB:  Most of my life I spent in Armenia. That’s where my roots are, that’s where my style has been developed. However, it was only after moving to Australia in 2008, that I decided to focus all my attention on art and to become a full-time freelance artist and illustrator.  Each of the places I lived in my life – Armenia, Russia, US, and now Australia, left its certain trace, however, I don’t think there is some direct influence of the place. My art is more about some inner space.

AP: Did you have formal training if so what? If you are self taught can you tell us what you prefer about being a self taught artist vs having formal training.
SB:   My sole formal art training came from a two years of study in the art college in Yerevan and several months of private art classes, so most of my artistic skills were developed by myself.  I dropped the college, because as a kid I hated being told what to draw and was really bored by the academic studies. My other life-long interest was literature which brought me eventually to Moscow Maxim Gorky Literature Institute and I pursued the career of a translator of literature, although I never stopped drawing. Sometimes I really regret not having formal art training, feeling that I might have missed something very important. But then I comfort myself by the thought that being self-taught is not that bad at all. After all I spent my time on learning what I really wanted and needed.

AP: Can you tell us about where you make your work is it in your house, a studio etc.. and how it effects your work.
SB: : Unfortunately, I don’t have a studio, I work from home, in a small, but rather cosy and bright room, where I feel quite comfortable. It is not well suited for large-scale and messy projects, but it’s good enough for what I usually do.

AP: What are some of you favorite design projects/exhibitions you have worked on to date.
SB: I have been quite excited by my first solo exhibition, organized by the Armenian Embassy in Washington DC, but that’s probably just because it was my first one. I hope the most interesting is still ahead.

AP: What is your medium of choice.
SB:  Pen and ink is my all time favorite and has some very special place in my life. However, I love experimenting with different textures and techniques. Recently I am getting addicted to my Wacom tablet, creating digital compositions, based on freehand graphite drawings.

AP: What is the relationship between technique and content in your work.
SB:  Well, it depends… Sometimes the process, especially when I work with pen and ink, is something like a meditation for me. The content is woven from the pieces of my thoughts and dreams that reveal themselves and evolve in the process, and I don’t even think about technique while working. However, there are certain projects – not only commissions, but the personal pieces as well – where I have a very specific concept in my mind and try to find the best medium and style to realize them.  

AP: Who are some of the artists that have inspired you and or your work.
SB:  Numerous brilliant artists, from the old masters to my contemporaries, but no direct influences, it’s hard to name someone in particular.

AP: In what direction would you like to see your work going over the next five years.
SB:  More new works that I am happy with, more sales, more exhibitions and interesting illustration commissions that will bring me recognition and sense of accomplishment, helping me to feel that I am moving in the right direction.

AP: What forth coming projects and or exhibitions do you have scheduled for 2011.
SB: I hope to finish and publish my “Bestiarium”, the book of beasts of the Inner land, self-initiated book project I started last year. 

AP: Take us on a guided tour through a day in your life as an artist.
SB:  Wish I could spend more time on my artwork, but there are too many distractions – some pleasant, some not. I have a family I have to take care of, so during the day I try to make time for my work (including reading and internet) in between of the house chores. The favorite and most productive time is after 7 pm.

AP: Thank you so much for taking the time to answer our questions.
SB: Thank you for featuring my work!

Artist Proof Interview with Artist: Sona Babajanyan 

Global Location: Brisbane, Australia

URL:  http://www.sonasart.com

AP Shop URL: http://www.zazzle.com/sonash/

Sona is a self-taught graphic artist and illustrator from Armenia, currently living in Brisbane, Australia. She has been working as a translator of literature, editor, and graphic designer, and it was not until 2008, when she finally decided to focus all her attention on art and illustration.  Sona’s works are full of subtle humor, poetry and magic. Many of her works are held in private collections in Europe and the US. She works both in traditional and digital media, showing exclusively individual style both in color and black and white. 

SnowDreams card

AP: How long have you been making art for and what lead you to start.

SB:  I have been drawing and painting since I can remember myself. I grew up in a very creative and art-loving family, and my parents encouraged all my “artistic endeavors” to the extent that at the age of 5 I was allowed to paint all the walls of our living room with gouache. I still remember those big bright flowers that stayed there for quite a while, filling myself with a sense of my own greatness. Wish I could bring some of that feeling back!

Noomshiresnew

AP: Where do you currently live and work and how does this influence your work.

SB:  Most of my life I spent in Armenia. That’s where my roots are, that’s where my style has been developed. However, it was only after moving to Australia in 2008, that I decided to focus all my attention on art and to become a full-time freelance artist and illustrator.  Each of the places I lived in my life – Armenia, Russia, US, and now Australia, left its certain trace, however, I don’t think there is some direct influence of the place. My art is more about some inner space.

Gifts of Aya

AP: Did you have formal training if so what? If you are self taught can you tell us what you prefer about being a self taught artist vs having formal training.

SB:   My sole formal art training came from a two years of study in the art college in Yerevan and several months of private art classes, so most of my artistic skills were developed by myself.  I dropped the college, because as a kid I hated being told what to draw and was really bored by the academic studies. My other life-long interest was literature which brought me eventually to Moscow Maxim Gorky Literature Institute and I pursued the career of a translator of literature, although I never stopped drawing. Sometimes I really regret not having formal art training, feeling that I might have missed something very important. But then I comfort myself by the thought that being self-taught is not that bad at all. After all I spent my time on learning what I really wanted and needed.

Halloween

AP: Can you tell us about where you make your work is it in your house, a studio etc.. and how it effects your work.

SB: : Unfortunately, I don’t have a studio, I work from home, in a small, but rather cosy and bright room, where I feel quite comfortable. It is not well suited for large-scale and messy projects, but it’s good enough for what I usually do.

Passing_Through

AP: What are some of you favorite design projects/exhibitions you have worked on to date.

SB: I have been quite excited by my first solo exhibition, organized by the Armenian Embassy in Washington DC, but that’s probably just because it was my first one. I hope the most interesting is still ahead.

Family Portrait-1

AP: What is your medium of choice.

SB:  Pen and ink is my all time favorite and has some very special place in my life. However, I love experimenting with different textures and techniques. Recently I am getting addicted to my Wacom tablet, creating digital compositions, based on freehand graphite drawings.

Family Portrait-2

AP: What is the relationship between technique and content in your work.

SB:  Well, it depends… Sometimes the process, especially when I work with pen and ink, is something like a meditation for me. The content is woven from the pieces of my thoughts and dreams that reveal themselves and evolve in the process, and I don’t even think about technique while working. However, there are certain projects – not only commissions, but the personal pieces as well – where I have a very specific concept in my mind and try to find the best medium and style to realize them.  

Lady Do

AP: Who are some of the artists that have inspired you and or your work.

SB:  Numerous brilliant artists, from the old masters to my contemporaries, but no direct influences, it’s hard to name someone in particular.

Mistress of Green

AP: In what direction would you like to see your work going over the next five years.

SB:  More new works that I am happy with, more sales, more exhibitions and interesting illustration commissions that will bring me recognition and sense of accomplishment, helping me to feel that I am moving in the right direction.

Umber

AP: What forth coming projects and or exhibitions do you have scheduled for 2011.

SB: I hope to finish and publish my “Bestiarium”, the book of beasts of the Inner land, self-initiated book project I started last year. 

The Imp

AP: Take us on a guided tour through a day in your life as an artist.

SB:  Wish I could spend more time on my artwork, but there are too many distractions – some pleasant, some not. I have a family I have to take care of, so during the day I try to make time for my work (including reading and internet) in between of the house chores. The favorite and most productive time is after 7 pm.

sona

AP: Thank you so much for taking the time to answer our questions.

SB: Thank you for featuring my work!


Nov 9
Artist Proof Interview with Artist: Philippe A. Fernandez
Global Location: La Mirada, CA. USA
URL:   http://www.facebook.com/fairytalebuzz
AP Shop URL: http://www.zazzle.com/philippesarts
Philippe A. Fernandez, is a passionate self-taught visual artist,with a great love for fantasy and fairy tales. Philippe’s paintings have been crafted over many countless hours and employ the universal concepts of youth with the co-existence of dark and light. This invokes a starkness and somewhat foreboding look and feel that lends itself to storytelling.
AP: How long have you been making art for and what lead you to start.
Philippesarts: In the Holiday season of 2007 I gained ART through the creation of vintage Tea & Coffee stained Holiday cards. I moved around the tea and coffee stain and shapes, trees, and landscapes appeared. I have been painting ever since.

AP: Where do you currently live and work and how does this influence your work.
Philippesarts: I live and work in La Mirada, California. U.S.
My art is not influenced by memory, thought or living space. My artwork is what I hold in my heart and hands. My art is me. It’s who I am. It’s where I wish to be.

AP: Did you have formal training if so whatω If your self taught can you tell us what you prefer about being a self taught artist vs having formal training.
Philippesarts: I am 100% completely a self taught artist. As a matter of fact I can’t say that I personally even know of any artists. I somewhat wonder at times if formal training in the arts would help any. As of today, I am pretty confident with my own skill and it’s natural development.

AP: Can you tell us about where you make your work is it in your house, a studio etc.. and how it effects your work.
Philippesarts: I work full-time out of my home based studio and love it.

AP: What are some of you favorite design projects/exhibitions you have worked on to date.
Philippesarts: I don’t like working on projects and I hate having exhibitions. For me, I think both just add unnecessary stresses. I am happy when I paint, and paint best when I’m at ease.

AP: What is your medium of choice.
Philippesarts: I love acrylic on wood, but I can work with pretty much anything.

AP: What is the relationship between technique and content in your work.
Philippesarts: I put paint to a canvas, and start mixing some random colors together, I begin to see shadows form and take shape. Just then I’ll become inspired to finish that shape that magically appeared. Before I know it, I’ll have a completed painting with no thought to it at all.

AP: Who are some of the artists that have inspired you and or your work.
Philippesarts: I respect and care for all artists. But I think if you mixed Tim Burton, Edward Gorey, and Thomas Kinkade together, I would put that artist top on my list. J

AP: In what direction would you like to see your work going over the next five years.
Philippesarts: I would really love to start painting on a grander scale. I want to push my details to a more skilled level and eventually become a serious pro! I would love to be a successful illustrator for children books.

AP: What forth coming projects and or exhibitions do you have scheduled for 2011.
Philippesarts: I have some big things happening in mid 2012. Please check my face book for all upcoming shows and events. http://www.facebook.com/fairytalebuzz

AP: Take us on a guided tour through a day in your life as an artist.
Philippesarts: From 8 am to 11 pm, coffee, think, coffee, think, paint, think, paint, coffee, think, paint, internet, think. That’s about my week day.

AP: Thank you so much for taking the time to answer our questions.
Philippesarts: Thanks for asking J

Artist Proof Interview with Artist: Philippe A. Fernandez

Global Location: La Mirada, CA. USA

URL:   http://www.facebook.com/fairytalebuzz

AP Shop URL: http://www.zazzle.com/philippesarts

Philippe A. Fernandez, is a passionate self-taught visual artist,with a great love for fantasy and fairy tales. Philippe’s paintings have been crafted over many countless hours and employ the universal concepts of youth with the co-existence of dark and light. This invokes a starkness and somewhat foreboding look and feel that lends itself to storytelling.

AP: How long have you been making art for and what lead you to start.

Philippesarts: In the Holiday season of 2007 I gained ART through the creation of vintage Tea & Coffee stained Holiday cards. I moved around the tea and coffee stain and shapes, trees, and landscapes appeared. I have been painting ever since.

Philippe Fernandez

AP: Where do you currently live and work and how does this influence your work.

Philippesarts: I live and work in La Mirada, California. U.S.

My art is not influenced by memory, thought or living space. My artwork is what I hold in my heart and hands. My art is me. It’s who I am. It’s where I wish to be.

Wagon Trails

AP: Did you have formal training if so whatω If your self taught can you tell us what you prefer about being a self taught artist vs having formal training.

Philippesarts: I am 100% completely a self taught artist. As a matter of fact I can’t say that I personally even know of any artists. I somewhat wonder at times if formal training in the arts would help any. As of today, I am pretty confident with my own skill and it’s natural development.

Story Telling

AP: Can you tell us about where you make your work is it in your house, a studio etc.. and how it effects your work.

Philippesarts: I work full-time out of my home based studio and love it.

Steps To Love

AP: What are some of you favorite design projects/exhibitions you have worked on to date.

Philippesarts: I don’t like working on projects and I hate having exhibitions. For me, I think both just add unnecessary stresses. I am happy when I paint, and paint best when I’m at ease.

Hop Skip And A jump

AP: What is your medium of choice.

Philippesarts: I love acrylic on wood, but I can work with pretty much anything.

Left Behind

AP: What is the relationship between technique and content in your work.

Philippesarts: I put paint to a canvas, and start mixing some random colors together, I begin to see shadows form and take shape. Just then I’ll become inspired to finish that shape that magically appeared. Before I know it, I’ll have a completed painting with no thought to it at all.

Hide And Seek

AP: Who are some of the artists that have inspired you and or your work.

Philippesarts: I respect and care for all artists. But I think if you mixed Tim Burton, Edward Gorey, and Thomas Kinkade together, I would put that artist top on my list. J

Heading Home

AP: In what direction would you like to see your work going over the next five years.

Philippesarts: I would really love to start painting on a grander scale. I want to push my details to a more skilled level and eventually become a serious pro! I would love to be a successful illustrator for children books.

Come One Come All

AP: What forth coming projects and or exhibitions do you have scheduled for 2011.

Philippesarts: I have some big things happening in mid 2012. Please check my face book for all upcoming shows and events. http://www.facebook.com/fairytalebuzz

As Nightfall's

AP: Take us on a guided tour through a day in your life as an artist.

Philippesarts: From 8 am to 11 pm, coffee, think, coffee, think, paint, think, paint, coffee, think, paint, internet, think. That’s about my week day.

Philippe Fernandez 2

AP: Thank you so much for taking the time to answer our questions.

Philippesarts: Thanks for asking J


Nov 2
Artist Proof Interview with Artist: Amanda Lynn
Global Location: San Francisco, CA 
URL: www.Amandalynn.biz
AP Shop URL: www.Zazzle.com/Amandalynn
Coming from a traditional fine art background, Amandalynn takes her expertise in art and painting into an array of applications. She studied at the Academy of Art in San Francisco and received a Bachelor’s of Fine Art with an Illustration major. After school, she worked independently and freelance on many mural productions and theater set painting. Amandalynn then reached further into the study and application of paint through the automotive industry, where she painted, repaired, customized and restored motorcycles, cars, trucks, helmets, bicycles and much more. Her work in this industry taught her the necessary skills to successfully and properly restore and create sculptures for many Universities, Museums, Art Centers and private collectors. Amandalynn loves to paint and ‘fix’ objects back to their original beauty. Her passion lies in the creation of fine art, which she implements in her personal work, as well as in assisting other artists during the creation and repair their own projects. Amandalynn has an inexhaustible imagination and energy for the development and production of any and all types of art. She recently has begun further expanding her skills into the fashion design industry and merchandising display. Amandalynn continues to push her own fine art career by hosting, curating and participating in gallery shows around the world. Her work can be seen on her website  http://www.amandalynn.biz or on a more day to day basis on her blog,  http://amandalynnpaintings.blogspot.com.

AP: How long have you been making art for and what lead you to start.
AL: I have been creating art since I was a small child, I was very fortunate to have a family that always encouraged me to be creative.

AP: Where do you currently  live and work ω And how does this influence your work.
AL: I live in San Francisco, CA and work independently as a freelance muralist, designer and fine artist.  San Francisco is a place that could inspire anyone. The diversity of people and landscapes is unending. I see a crazy instance on the streets that makes me laugh out loud almost every single day.

AP: Did you have formal training if so whatω If your self taught can you tell us what you prefer about being a self taught artist vs having formal training.
AL:  I think we are all self taught in some way. Ultimately it is our own personal acceptance of what we feel is quality that defines us as an artist. However, I have been fortunate to have been taught and influenced by several great artists. I started off in Pennsylvania studying under Robin Grass , a very prolific and talented artist and teacher. When I got to San Francisco, I studied at the Academy of Art and was very inspired by two teachers, Mona Caron and the late Kazu Sano . I also met an extensive network of street artists who mostly belong to the Known Gallery , this group has inspired and joined me on many art projects over the last decade. I also have worked alongside and have learned a lot from some incredible artists in my freelance work.

AP: Can you tell us about where you make your work is it in your house, a studio etc.. and how it effects your work.
AL:  Well that really just depends on the size and extent of the project at hand. Mostly, I prefer to work out of my home studio, however I work at a couple other studios, such as Prairie Prince’s Stained Glass Art Studio, Cassel Gallery’s studio, and of course the streets! The art I make in the studio is much more refined and patient than most of the work I do on the street, but I enjoy both equally. 

AP: What are some of you favorite design projects/exhibitions you have worked on to date.
AL:  Well my current solo show, ‘Head over Heels’, opened this past June 4th at the Cassel Gallery in San Francisco and it was an amazing opening. I collaborated with my very close friend and inspiration, Renee Fontana   , she is an amazing floral designer, who compliments and accents my work beautifully. Renee and I also collaborated on my first solo show in LA in 2008, ‘Move A Head’, which was my favorite until this last one! I also have hosted and participated in several amazing group shows/events. The first one that started it all off was in 2004, ‘Witty Remarks’, and that’s where it all began.  

AP: What is your medium of choice.
AL:  I prefer to paint in acrylic on canvas, house paint on walls, and gold leaf with airbrush and one shot on my signage and furniture work.

AP: What is the relationship between technique and content in your work.
AL:  My technique in acrylic painting stems from my studies with Robin Grass , and his content tends to be a lot of females and fantasy. So, I guess those two things go hand and hand for me. Recently I started trying to blend all my techniques into all different applications, hopefully creating a style that is unique to me and my imagery content. 

AP: Who are some of the  artists that have inspired you and or your work.
AL:  All of them!  but I am a huge fan of Olivia De Beradinis 

AP: In what direction would you like to see your work going over the next five years.
AL:  I am currently trying to work more scenery and stories into my paintings. My goal is to be painting more personal work and doing less commercial work within the next 5 years. 

AP: What forth coming projects and or exhibitions do you have scheduled for 2011.
AL:  I am going to have a closing party for ‘Head over Heels’ at the Cassel Gallery on July 23, 2011. In August, I am curating a  group art show at the Wonderland Gallery  in San Francisco, titled ‘Majesty’. I am also helping and showing in several other upcoming group shows. You can check my blog for upcoming events,  http://Amandalynnpaintings.blogpot.com 

AP: Take us on a guided tour through a day in your life as an artist.
AL:  Ha! no day is ever the same. 

AP: Thank you so much for taking the time to answer our questions.

Artist Proof Interview with Artist: Amanda Lynn

Global Location: San Francisco, CA 

URL: www.Amandalynn.biz

AP Shop URL: www.Zazzle.com/Amandalynn

Coming from a traditional fine art background, Amandalynn takes her expertise in art and painting into an array of applications. She studied at the Academy of Art in San Francisco and received a Bachelor’s of Fine Art with an Illustration major. After school, she worked independently and freelance on many mural productions and theater set painting. Amandalynn then reached further into the study and application of paint through the automotive industry, where she painted, repaired, customized and restored motorcycles, cars, trucks, helmets, bicycles and much more. Her work in this industry taught her the necessary skills to successfully and properly restore and create sculptures for many Universities, Museums, Art Centers and private collectors. Amandalynn loves to paint and ‘fix’ objects back to their original beauty. Her passion lies in the creation of fine art, which she implements in her personal work, as well as in assisting other artists during the creation and repair their own projects. Amandalynn has an inexhaustible imagination and energy for the development and production of any and all types of art. She recently has begun further expanding her skills into the fashion design industry and merchandising display. Amandalynn continues to push her own fine art career by hosting, curating and participating in gallery shows around the world. Her work can be seen on her website  http://www.amandalynn.biz or on a more day to day basis on her blog,  http://amandalynnpaintings.blogspot.com.

Lola

AP: How long have you been making art for and what lead you to start.

AL: I have been creating art since I was a small child, I was very fortunate to have a family that always encouraged me to be creative.

Silver Girl

AP: Where do you currently  live and work ω And how does this influence your work.

AL: I live in San Francisco, CA and work independently as a freelance muralist, designer and fine artist.  San Francisco is a place that could inspire anyone. The diversity of people and landscapes is unending. I see a crazy instance on the streets that makes me laugh out loud almost every single day.

Patience

AP: Did you have formal training if so whatω If your self taught can you tell us what you prefer about being a self taught artist vs having formal training.

AL:  I think we are all self taught in some way. Ultimately it is our own personal acceptance of what we feel is quality that defines us as an artist. However, I have been fortunate to have been taught and influenced by several great artists. I started off in Pennsylvania studying under Robin Grass , a very prolific and talented artist and teacher. When I got to San Francisco, I studied at the Academy of Art and was very inspired by two teachers, Mona Caron and the late Kazu Sano . I also met an extensive network of street artists who mostly belong to the Known Gallery , this group has inspired and joined me on many art projects over the last decade. I also have worked alongside and have learned a lot from some incredible artists in my freelance work.

Foxy

AP: Can you tell us about where you make your work is it in your house, a studio etc.. and how it effects your work.

AL:  Well that really just depends on the size and extent of the project at hand. Mostly, I prefer to work out of my home studio, however I work at a couple other studios, such as Prairie Prince’s Stained Glass Art Studio, Cassel Gallery’s studio, and of course the streets! The art I make in the studio is much more refined and patient than most of the work I do on the street, but I enjoy both equally. 

Amandalynn

AP: What are some of you favorite design projects/exhibitions you have worked on to date.

AL:  Well my current solo show, ‘Head over Heels’, opened this past June 4th at the Cassel Gallery in San Francisco and it was an amazing opening. I collaborated with my very close friend and inspiration, Renee Fontana   , she is an amazing floral designer, who compliments and accents my work beautifully. Renee and I also collaborated on my first solo show in LA in 2008, ‘Move A Head’, which was my favorite until this last one! I also have hosted and participated in several amazing group shows/events. The first one that started it all off was in 2004, ‘Witty Remarks’, and that’s where it all began.  

Felix Forever

AP: What is your medium of choice.

AL:  I prefer to paint in acrylic on canvas, house paint on walls, and gold leaf with airbrush and one shot on my signage and furniture work.

victoria

AP: What is the relationship between technique and content in your work.

AL:  My technique in acrylic painting stems from my studies with Robin Grass , and his content tends to be a lot of females and fantasy. So, I guess those two things go hand and hand for me. Recently I started trying to blend all my techniques into all different applications, hopefully creating a style that is unique to me and my imagery content. 

Affinity

AP: Who are some of the  artists that have inspired you and or your work.

AL:  All of them!  but I am a huge fan of Olivia De Beradinis 

the secret

AP: In what direction would you like to see your work going over the next five years.

AL:  I am currently trying to work more scenery and stories into my paintings. My goal is to be painting more personal work and doing less commercial work within the next 5 years. 

After dinner guest

AP: What forth coming projects and or exhibitions do you have scheduled for 2011.

AL:  I am going to have a closing party for ‘Head over Heels’ at the Cassel Gallery on July 23, 2011. In August, I am curating a  group art show at the Wonderland Gallery  in San Francisco, titled ‘Majesty’. I am also helping and showing in several other upcoming group shows. You can check my blog for upcoming events,  http://Amandalynnpaintings.blogpot.com 

Time

AP: Take us on a guided tour through a day in your life as an artist.

AL:  Ha! no day is ever the same. 

Vehement

AP: Thank you so much for taking the time to answer our questions.


Oct 26
Artist Proof Interview with Artist: Jezabel Nekranea
Global Location: Spain
URL:  http://nekranea.blogspot.com/ 
AP Shop URL: http://www.zazzle.com/nekranea
Jezabel Nekranea is a Spanish artist born in 1976. She has worked as an illustrator, graphic designer and character designer, she has participated in several projects of animation, comic and illustrated books. Her personal work is usually inspired by nature, she loves imagining and creating magical beings, hybrids between humans and animals or plants. She also has started sculpting this year, giving life to small creatures made of polymer clay.

AP: How long have you been making art for and what lead you to start.
JN:I’ve been drawing since I was a child and always wanted to become an artist. I worked as a vector illustrator and graphic designer in some companies in the past, but it was not very creative. I found a real way to express myself just a few years ago, my overactive imagination, the need to put my ideas on paper and create my own worlds and characters have led me making art for a living.

AP: Where do you currently live and work and how does this influence your work.
JN: I used to live in the city but I moved to the countryside two years ago, I´m living in a village an hour and a half from Madrid, my artwork is totally inspired by nature since I live here. I like quiet life and being in contact with nature, I love watching the storks in front of my house, the swallows’ nests out of my window, breath fresh air, go to the river, walk into the woods, find skulls of animals, collect flowers, listen the birds… . Nature elements are very usual in my personal work, I love creating magical beings that looks like hybrids between humans and animals or plants.

AP: Did you have formal training if so whatω If your self taught can you tell us what you prefer about being a self taught artist vs having formal training.
JN: I took some art classes in the past but I don´t have any art degree and I´m totally self taught in digital painting and sculpture. Technique is an obsession to me and I spend much time researching and experimenting, I want to learn more and more!. Probably this learning process would be easier if I had formal training but also I think being self taught helps me to follow my own path, achieve the better way to express myself and create a unique style. I know what´s inside me and what are my goals so I´m my better guide.

AP: Can you tell us about where you make your work is it in your house, a studio etc.. and how it effects your work.
JN: My partner and I work at home, he is the great artist Felideus, we have an art studio-living room in our house where we spent all day, working in our commissions, personal projects, learning, discovering other artists´ work, watching inspiring movies, networking… it´s pretty great because all our time is dedicated to make and enjoy art, but sometimes we spend too much time indoors, we are very obsessive and we have high goals.

AP: What are some of you favorite design projects/exhibitions you have worked on to date.
JN: So far my personal works have been more interesting than my commission works and I´ve not had any exhibition of my work yet. Probably my series of nature spirits is my favorite project to date.

AP: What is your medium of choice.
JN: Most of my painting works are digital, this medium helped me to improve my skills very fast, it´s easy trying new things without worrying about mess up your work. Anyway, I´d like a more traditional look in my personal work so I´m going to practice traditional techniques, especially acrylics with color pencil. In sculpture, I’ve only used polymer clay painted with acrylics so far.

AP: What is the relationship between technique and content in your work.
JN: I´d like to achieve a perfect balance between both. I´m happy with the content in my work, I think I have a characteristic imagination and my own style of drawing, but I´m still working on the technique. I´d like to find a characteristic technique too, a better way to express my ideas that makes my work unique. The sculpture is helping me finding new ways to create.

AP: Who are some of the  artists that have inspired you and or your work.
JN: I think Renaissance and Pre-Raphaelite painters and Hayao Miyazaki are the artists who have inspired my work the most, but there is an endless list of artists with different styles and techniques that inspire me.

AP: In what direction would you like to see your work going over the next five years.
JN: There are lots of things that I´d like to do. I want to work more traditional techniques, create several sculptures/art dolls and do some art shows, also I´d like to work in some animation shorts, mixing painting and stop motion animation, work in some illustrated books, and so on. There are endless possibilities and I´m open to all.

AP: What forth coming projects and or exhibitions do you have scheduled for 2011.
JN: I’m working on a series of sculptures/art dolls about spirits and creatures of nature and also I´ll make another series of little sculptures/art toys designed by my partner Felideus and sculpted by me. These sculptures will be on sale before the end of this year.

AP: Take us on a guided tour through a day in your life as an artist.
JN: Sometimes I spend long periods with strict timetables, waking up very early, practicing meditation and some yoga exercises, eating lots of fruit and working at the same hours all days, but sometimes I have a bit chaotic periods, without working out, and working and eating irregularly, I can spend lots of hours working in something without eating nor sleeping. I usually have these little chaotic periods when I´m going through changes, experimenting creative or emotional crisis. I think they are necessary steps in my life to rebirth and achieve new goals.

AP: Thank you so much for taking the time to answer our questions.
JN:Thank you very much for featuring my work.

Artist Proof Interview with Artist: Jezabel Nekranea

Global Location: Spain

URL:  http://nekranea.blogspot.com/ 

AP Shop URL: http://www.zazzle.com/nekranea

Jezabel Nekranea is a Spanish artist born in 1976. She has worked as an illustrator, graphic designer and character designer, she has participated in several projects of animation, comic and illustrated books. Her personal work is usually inspired by nature, she loves imagining and creating magical beings, hybrids between humans and animals or plants. She also has started sculpting this year, giving life to small creatures made of polymer clay.

Shinskra__wind_spirit_by_Nekranea

AP: How long have you been making art for and what lead you to start.

JN:I’ve been drawing since I was a child and always wanted to become an artist. I worked as a vector illustrator and graphic designer in some companies in the past, but it was not very creative. I found a real way to express myself just a few years ago, my overactive imagination, the need to put my ideas on paper and create my own worlds and characters have led me making art for a living.

NatureCreature01_by_Nekranea

AP: Where do you currently live and work and how does this influence your work.

JN: I used to live in the city but I moved to the countryside two years ago, I´m living in a village an hour and a half from Madrid, my artwork is totally inspired by nature since I live here. I like quiet life and being in contact with nature, I love watching the storks in front of my house, the swallows’ nests out of my window, breath fresh air, go to the river, walk into the woods, find skulls of animals, collect flowers, listen the birds… . Nature elements are very usual in my personal work, I love creating magical beings that looks like hybrids between humans and animals or plants.

NekraneaStudio

AP: Did you have formal training if so whatω If your self taught can you tell us what you prefer about being a self taught artist vs having formal training.

JN: I took some art classes in the past but I don´t have any art degree and I´m totally self taught in digital painting and sculpture. Technique is an obsession to me and I spend much time researching and experimenting, I want to learn more and more!. Probably this learning process would be easier if I had formal training but also I think being self taught helps me to follow my own path, achieve the better way to express myself and create a unique style. I know what´s inside me and what are my goals so I´m my better guide.

NekraneaPhoto

AP: Can you tell us about where you make your work is it in your house, a studio etc.. and how it effects your work.

JN: My partner and I work at home, he is the great artist Felideus, we have an art studio-living room in our house where we spent all day, working in our commissions, personal projects, learning, discovering other artists´ work, watching inspiring movies, networking… it´s pretty great because all our time is dedicated to make and enjoy art, but sometimes we spend too much time indoors, we are very obsessive and we have high goals.

Flora_by_Nekranea

AP: What are some of you favorite design projects/exhibitions you have worked on to date.

JN: So far my personal works have been more interesting than my commission works and I´ve not had any exhibition of my work yet. Probably my series of nature spirits is my favorite project to date.

BabyHummingbird_by_Nekranea

AP: What is your medium of choice.

JN: Most of my painting works are digital, this medium helped me to improve my skills very fast, it´s easy trying new things without worrying about mess up your work. Anyway, I´d like a more traditional look in my personal work so I´m going to practice traditional techniques, especially acrylics with color pencil. In sculpture, I’ve only used polymer clay painted with acrylics so far.

NatureCreature02_by_Nekranea

AP: What is the relationship between technique and content in your work.

JN: I´d like to achieve a perfect balance between both. I´m happy with the content in my work, I think I have a characteristic imagination and my own style of drawing, but I´m still working on the technique. I´d like to find a characteristic technique too, a better way to express my ideas that makes my work unique. The sculpture is helping me finding new ways to create.

Amaelsh__forest_spirit_by_Nekranea

AP: Who are some of the  artists that have inspired you and or your work.

JN: I think Renaissance and Pre-Raphaelite painters and Hayao Miyazaki are the artists who have inspired my work the most, but there is an endless list of artists with different styles and techniques that inspire me.

The_Spirit_of_the_Flowers_by_Nekranea

AP: In what direction would you like to see your work going over the next five years.

JN: There are lots of things that I´d like to do. I want to work more traditional techniques, create several sculptures/art dolls and do some art shows, also I´d like to work in some animation shorts, mixing painting and stop motion animation, work in some illustrated books, and so on. There are endless possibilities and I´m open to all.

The_Sacred_Mountain_by_Nekranea

AP: What forth coming projects and or exhibitions do you have scheduled for 2011.

JN: I’m working on a series of sculptures/art dolls about spirits and creatures of nature and also I´ll make another series of little sculptures/art toys designed by my partner Felideus and sculpted by me. These sculptures will be on sale before the end of this year.

FromSadness_by_Nekranea

AP: Take us on a guided tour through a day in your life as an artist.

JN: Sometimes I spend long periods with strict timetables, waking up very early, practicing meditation and some yoga exercises, eating lots of fruit and working at the same hours all days, but sometimes I have a bit chaotic periods, without working out, and working and eating irregularly, I can spend lots of hours working in something without eating nor sleeping. I usually have these little chaotic periods when I´m going through changes, experimenting creative or emotional crisis. I think they are necessary steps in my life to rebirth and achieve new goals.

Bird_Soul_by_Nekranea

AP: Thank you so much for taking the time to answer our questions.

JN:Thank you very much for featuring my work.


Oct 19
Artist Proof Interview with Artist: Autumn Rain Turkel
Global Location: Los Angeles, CA, USA
URL:  http://autumnrainturkel.com/
AP Shop URL:  http://www.zazzle.com/arturkel*
I am a life long artist who lives and works around LA. I graduated from Art Center College of Design in 2006 and have been working since then in the freelance and corporate entertainment world. My personal work is what you will generally find in my galleries as it is much more meaningful to me. 

AP: How long have you been making art for and what lead you to start.
AT: I have been an artist my entire life. I lacked training at a young age, but ultimately found the will and funding to get to a great school. My initial inspiration to become an artist were comic books, album covers for metal bands, and the fantasy works of dungeons and dragons artists.

AP: Where do you currently live and work and how does this influence your work.
AT: I am in Los Angeles, I am not sure if it influences my work all that much. Maybe if I sat in traffic more I would be more aggressive with what I do.

AP: Did you have formal training if so whatω If your self taught can you tell us what you prefer about being a self taught artist vs having formal training.
AT: I was self taught for many years, then went to school in my late twenties. Honestly, if you have the drive there is no difference. In training, in fact those who are self taught may be more acutely aware of the ideas and concepts of art as they have had to observe them for themselves, rather than having someone explain them. At this point I am going back to being self taught, as we all need to continue to grow. I think that either approach has pros and cons, so just make the best art with whatever schooling you can muster yourself.

AP: Can you tell us about where you make your work is it in your house, a studio etc.. and how it effects your work.
AT: I make art in my house. My entire living and dining area is devoted to my studio setup. If anything it keeps me working at smaller sizes as I cannot have huge canvases without ruining the place.

AP: What are some of you favorite design projects/exhibitions you have worked on to date.
AT: I think the game duels was well put together and had much creative freedom for the artists involved, it was enjoyable. 

AP: What is your medium of choice.
AT: It’s more of a medium of the moment. Whatever I feel like doing. There really are no limits.

AP: What is the relationship between technique and content in your work.
AT: In my work, the content is tied to the technique as they define one another. However, the painterly approach is the emotional crux that allows others to project their own ideas onto what I do. It is important that they be able to bring things to the art that I had never intended. This allows others to connect in ways I hadn’t thought of.
AP: Who are some of the  artists that have inspired you and or your work.
AT: Robh Ruppel, Daniel Landerman, John Singer Sargent, Richard Schmid, Casey Baugh, Jeremy Lipking, Micheal Hussar

AP: In what direction would you like to see your work going over the next five years.
AT: I will be doing more oil painting and portrait style work for myself, possibly even abandoning digital all together, or developing a hybrid approach.

AP: What forth coming projects and or exhibitions do you have scheduled for 2011.
AT: I can’t discuss that with you at the moment. Or more to the point, I could, but then I would have to kill you. And you all seem like such nice people, that would be a shame.

AP: Take us on a guided tour through a day in your life as an artist.
AT: Wake up, make coffee, run a few miles, shower, drink coffee while answering emails, warm up gesture drawings and sketches, work for 3-4 hours, lunch get outside and enjoy the sun, or hit the gym to get some exercise, home to shower, back to the drawing board (or painting,) Dinner, head to the Original Drink and Draw Social Club in LA (only on thursdays,) home, check emails for freelance, bed. Other things that permeate my artistic existence are photo shoots for reference, art openings, and schmoozing clients. 

AP: Thank you so much for taking the time to answer our questions.
Thank you for having me I appreciate the support and everything AP does to promote art. 

Artist Proof Interview with Artist: Autumn Rain Turkel

Global Location: Los Angeles, CA, USA

URL:  http://autumnrainturkel.com/

AP Shop URL:  http://www.zazzle.com/arturkel*

I am a life long artist who lives and works around LA. I graduated from Art Center College of Design in 2006 and have been working since then in the freelance and corporate entertainment world. My personal work is what you will generally find in my galleries as it is much more meaningful to me. 

warrior_battle15

AP: How long have you been making art for and what lead you to start.

AT: I have been an artist my entire life. I lacked training at a young age, but ultimately found the will and funding to get to a great school. My initial inspiration to become an artist were comic books, album covers for metal bands, and the fantasy works of dungeons and dragons artists.

Sketch_battling2_small

AP: Where do you currently live and work and how does this influence your work.

AT: I am in Los Angeles, I am not sure if it influences my work all that much. Maybe if I sat in traffic more I would be more aggressive with what I do.

flyingelf_final

AP: Did you have formal training if so whatω If your self taught can you tell us what you prefer about being a self taught artist vs having formal training.

AT: I was self taught for many years, then went to school in my late twenties. Honestly, if you have the drive there is no difference. In training, in fact those who are self taught may be more acutely aware of the ideas and concepts of art as they have had to observe them for themselves, rather than having someone explain them. At this point I am going back to being self taught, as we all need to continue to grow. I think that either approach has pros and cons, so just make the best art with whatever schooling you can muster yourself.

eowyn_Vs_nazgul_14

AP: Can you tell us about where you make your work is it in your house, a studio etc.. and how it effects your work.

AT: I make art in my house. My entire living and dining area is devoted to my studio setup. If anything it keeps me working at smaller sizes as I cannot have huge canvases without ruining the place.

dragon1_14

AP: What are some of you favorite design projects/exhibitions you have worked on to date.

AT: I think the game duels was well put together and had much creative freedom for the artists involved, it was enjoyable. 

Sierra-Longstudy-01

AP: What is your medium of choice.

AT: It’s more of a medium of the moment. Whatever I feel like doing. There really are no limits.

Cami-Longstudy

AP: What is the relationship between technique and content in your work.

AT: In my work, the content is tied to the technique as they define one another. However, the painterly approach is the emotional crux that allows others to project their own ideas onto what I do. It is important that they be able to bring things to the art that I had never intended. This allows others to connect in ways I hadn’t thought of.

AP: Who are some of the  artists that have inspired you and or your work.

AT: Robh Ruppel, Daniel Landerman, John Singer Sargent, Richard Schmid, Casey Baugh, Jeremy Lipking, Micheal Hussar

seahydra_014

AP: In what direction would you like to see your work going over the next five years.

AT: I will be doing more oil painting and portrait style work for myself, possibly even abandoning digital all together, or developing a hybrid approach.

sketch_dragon_3

AP: What forth coming projects and or exhibitions do you have scheduled for 2011.

AT: I can’t discuss that with you at the moment. Or more to the point, I could, but then I would have to kill you. And you all seem like such nice people, that would be a shame.

Sierra-Longstudy-04

AP: Take us on a guided tour through a day in your life as an artist.

AT: Wake up, make coffee, run a few miles, shower, drink coffee while answering emails, warm up gesture drawings and sketches, work for 3-4 hours, lunch get outside and enjoy the sun, or hit the gym to get some exercise, home to shower, back to the drawing board (or painting,) Dinner, head to the Original Drink and Draw Social Club in LA (only on thursdays,) home, check emails for freelance, bed. Other things that permeate my artistic existence are photo shoots for reference, art openings, and schmoozing clients. 

Sierra-Longstudy-03

AP: Thank you so much for taking the time to answer our questions.

Thank you for having me I appreciate the support and everything AP does to promote art. 


Oct 12
Artist Proof Interview with Artist: Nell Fallcard
Global Location: From Mexico, living in UK
URL:  http://www.nell-f.com
AP Shop URL:  http://www.zazzle.co.uk/nellfallcard
I was born in Mexico, started drawing at 5 years old, trying comic stuff at 8, and started poking Photoshop at 13. I got a Bachelor Degree in Integral Design, then been working for 5 years for animation and video game studios, digital experience companies and as a teacher in higher education schools.  Currently in the process of being enrolled on a Masters in UK.

AP: How long have you been making art for and what lead you to start.
NF: As far as I remember, I made my first attempts at 5, so you could say I have more than 20 years on this, but what I do started taking decent shape when I was about 18, so quite a long way before stopping doing crap :D 
I started on this inspired by the cartoons I used to watch as a child. I wanted to be immerse on these worlds, tweak them and modify them so they could fit my own fantasies.

AP: Where do you currently live and work and how does this influence your work.
NF: I’ve been living all my life in Mexico, different cities. I don’t feel like they have affected radically my work. Work conditions do, though: I tend to perform better in well lighted areas, warm light, and when I am by my own rather than with a group of people - coworkers are not as cuddle-able as my cat… my cat isn’t precisely cuddle-able either but I can overpower him so he has no choice. Traveling tends to inspire me too.Currently I just made a major move, been living in London for two months now. Too soon to know the London effect over my mind and body, let’s see.

AP: Did you have formal training if so whatω If your self taught can you tell us what you prefer about being a self taught artist vs having formal training.
NF: I am a crossbreed :D  I’ve had formal training in some areas but most of it came just to reinforce what I already knew by doing my own research. The tricks I do that bring the bacon to the table I learnt by myself, sharing with likeminded people and stuff. 

AP: Can you tell us about where you make your work is it in your house, a studio etc.. and how it effects your work.
NF: I’ve worked in both conditions. I prefer to work from home by far. I perform better when there are no meetings, ringing phones, and goofing people around. I like the goofing people, though. They say funny things like “this file has as many layers as Methuselah”.

AP: What are some of you favorite design projects/exhibitions you have worked on to date.
NF: The “Dragons” Illustration I made in 2008. It won a competition, so I got sent several goodies thanks to it. It was also a really enjoyable process because I had no rush, no guidelines, I painted it during my free time whenever I felt like it so the end result was the product of a very enjoyable process and that got reflected on the piece, I guess. 

AP: What is your medium of choice.
NF: Photoshop is my father, and father of us all.

AP: What is the relationship between technique and content in your work.
NF: I focus more on the technique, and rarely add content to it unless is necessary. My last piece, “be their angel”, has a message since I though might be suitable for the nature of the contest I made it for, the same I made a poster for an exhibition about Peace that has a message the audience found strong and moving, but that is not present on my personal images. If you become abstract, people become psychologist and assume you have issues. I find that annoying.

AP: Who are some of the  artists that have inspired you and or your work.
NF:Enayla and Ayami Kojima are the artists that shaped my current style. Yet still, my aim is to develop an inner world as rich as the ones of Ryan Church or Zdzislaw Beksinski.

AP: In what direction would you like to see your work going over the next five years.
Answer: I would love to be in charge of the look and feel of a movie.

AP: What forth coming projects and or exhibitions do you have scheduled for 2011.
NF: I am planning to study a Masters degree in 3D Imagery, so I can expand my skills to other fields. I also applied for a government support program back on my country to work on a project regarding Color Theory, explained visually. Since it will require a lot of effort and commitment, I will work on that collection depending on the results. 

AP: Take us on a guided tour through a day in your life as an artist.
NF: Woah, that one tends to change depending if I am freelancing or working for a studio. Since the freelance one is the one I enjoy the most - and I am currently doing - I’d say: I wake up late, really late; get some food and start my computer. Check e-mail and social networks, then I start either painting in Photoshop or animating in Flash. When I get tired I take a break, either checking websites like 9gag.com, fmylife.com or clientsfromhell.com, or watching a show, talking with friends or grab a snack, then back to work. This process repeats itself until the evening, where I might go out or stay at home with Mr. Boyfriend doing random stuff until we go to sleep. Usually late. Very late. 

AP: Thank you so much for taking the time to answer our questions.

Artist Proof Interview with Artist: Nell Fallcard

Global Location: From Mexico, living in UK

URL:  http://www.nell-f.com

AP Shop URL:  http://www.zazzle.co.uk/nellfallcard

I was born in Mexico, started drawing at 5 years old, trying comic stuff at 8, and started poking Photoshop at 13. I got a Bachelor Degree in Integral Design, then been working for 5 years for animation and video game studios, digital experience companies and as a teacher in higher education schools.  Currently in the process of being enrolled on a Masters in UK.

betheirangel500w

AP: How long have you been making art for and what lead you to start.

NF: As far as I remember, I made my first attempts at 5, so you could say I have more than 20 years on this, but what I do started taking decent shape when I was about 18, so quite a long way before stopping doing crap :D 

I started on this inspired by the cartoons I used to watch as a child. I wanted to be immerse on these worlds, tweak them and modify them so they could fit my own fantasies.

500wville

AP: Where do you currently live and work and how does this influence your work.

NF: I’ve been living all my life in Mexico, different cities. I don’t feel like they have affected radically my work. Work conditions do, though: I tend to perform better in well lighted areas, warm light, and when I am by my own rather than with a group of people - coworkers are not as cuddle-able as my cat… my cat isn’t precisely cuddle-able either but I can overpower him so he has no choice. Traveling tends to inspire me too.Currently I just made a major move, been living in London for two months now. Too soon to know the London effect over my mind and body, let’s see.

500wseed

AP: Did you have formal training if so whatω If your self taught can you tell us what you prefer about being a self taught artist vs having formal training.

NF: I am a crossbreed :D  I’ve had formal training in some areas but most of it came just to reinforce what I already knew by doing my own research. The tricks I do that bring the bacon to the table I learnt by myself, sharing with likeminded people and stuff. 

500wxmaz

AP: Can you tell us about where you make your work is it in your house, a studio etc.. and how it effects your work.

NF: I’ve worked in both conditions. I prefer to work from home by far. I perform better when there are no meetings, ringing phones, and goofing people around. I like the goofing people, though. They say funny things like “this file has as many layers as Methuselah”.

500wgreen

AP: What are some of you favorite design projects/exhibitions you have worked on to date.

NF: The “Dragons” Illustration I made in 2008. It won a competition, so I got sent several goodies thanks to it. It was also a really enjoyable process because I had no rush, no guidelines, I painted it during my free time whenever I felt like it so the end result was the product of a very enjoyable process and that got reflected on the piece, I guess. 

500wdragonsB

AP: What is your medium of choice.

NF: Photoshop is my father, and father of us all.

500wdragonsA

AP: What is the relationship between technique and content in your work.

NF: I focus more on the technique, and rarely add content to it unless is necessary. My last piece, “be their angel”, has a message since I though might be suitable for the nature of the contest I made it for, the same I made a poster for an exhibition about Peace that has a message the audience found strong and moving, but that is not present on my personal images. If you become abstract, people become psychologist and assume you have issues. I find that annoying.

500wchellio

AP: Who are some of the  artists that have inspired you and or your work.

NF:Enayla and Ayami Kojima are the artists that shaped my current style. Yet still, my aim is to develop an inner world as rich as the ones of Ryan Church or Zdzislaw Beksinski.

500wpet

AP: In what direction would you like to see your work going over the next five years.

Answer: I would love to be in charge of the look and feel of a movie.

500wlyoness

AP: What forth coming projects and or exhibitions do you have scheduled for 2011.

NF: I am planning to study a Masters degree in 3D Imagery, so I can expand my skills to other fields. I also applied for a government support program back on my country to work on a project regarding Color Theory, explained visually. Since it will require a lot of effort and commitment, I will work on that collection depending on the results. 

500wsclera

AP: Take us on a guided tour through a day in your life as an artist.

NF: Woah, that one tends to change depending if I am freelancing or working for a studio. Since the freelance one is the one I enjoy the most - and I am currently doing - I’d say: I wake up late, really late; get some food and start my computer. Check e-mail and social networks, then I start either painting in Photoshop or animating in Flash. When I get tired I take a break, either checking websites like 9gag.com, fmylife.com or clientsfromhell.com, or watching a show, talking with friends or grab a snack, then back to work. This process repeats itself until the evening, where I might go out or stay at home with Mr. Boyfriend doing random stuff until we go to sleep. Usually late. Very late. 

500wme

AP: Thank you so much for taking the time to answer our questions.


Oct 6
Artist Proof Interview with Artist: Ben Fellowes
Global Location: Orange County, California
URL:  http://www.benfellowes.com
AP Shop URL: http://www.zazzle.com/benfellowes
Working mainly in black and white, my illustration and graphic work has been used to promote everything from punk rock bands to hair salons. I paint, illustrate, and use digital mediums to create a diversity of artwork.   

AP: How long have you been making art for and what lead you to start.
BF: For as long as I can remember.  But what made me start wanting to draw was Judge Dredd. I used to read 2000ad (the brilliant comic that starred Judge Dredd) at about the age of seven. I loved the black and white ink artwork that was so “punk rock” and spoke of heroes and justice and future worlds yet to be explored. In fact, one of m y earliest memories was running to the corner shop to buy the latest copy of 2000ad.  I can still remember the way the ink smelled on the page. I relive that same thrill every time I open an ink bottle. It’s funny, but even though I have always had art in my life, I only started taking my own artwork seriously a couple of years ago when I was invited to exhibit a few pieces of my work at a small gallery in Southern California.

AP: Where do you currently live and work and how does this influence your work.
BF: I work as a Design and Marketing Manager. I create a lot of creative content that includes blog posts, web designs, and print materials. It forces me to think creatively and conceptually.  Even though my personal artwork and my practical day-to-day design work are very separate, I am always thinking of ideas and concepts. This means that I am very rarely in a non-creative mindset and stuck for something to sketch, doodle, write, or build. I live in Orange County in California but I’m a born ‘n’ bred Englishman and only resettled in the US 10 years ago with my wife who is a native Californian. I think my work reflects my British sense of humor and a certain cool California aesthetic (that’s how I self-publicize myself, anyway!) 

AP: Did you have formal training if so what? If your self taught can you tell us what you prefer about being a self taught artist vs having formal training?
BF: I think this question is an odd one because I believe that most artists are “self taught”. When it comes to the fundamentals of art and design, I think that there’s only so much someone can show you. Personally, there have been few moments in my life where I’ve had instructors actually show me what do, I’ve pretty much learned how to draw, paint, and sketch on my own.
In reference to my actual qualifications and training, I have a Degree in Graphic Design & Advertising as well as a Bachelors D degree in Print Journalism.  This training has aided me at times throughout my different career paths, but 
I sometimes wonder how much practical use they were? I was taught the basics of design and learnt how to draw, typeset, and compose a design.  But unfortunately, when I eventually got an industry job, agencies were expecting designers to know how to design with Photoshop and Illustrator! I had to teach myself really quickly how to use those programs to survive as a design professional. Becoming an expert in digital programs has definitely helped me to become (somewhat) successful in my career but I now find myself reverting back to the pen and paper to create my own artwork.  Although I love digital and vector art, and still utilize it often, there’s nothing more satisfying than creating something by hand that that is tangible and physical!

AP: Can you tell us about where you make your work is it in your house, a studio etc.. and how it effects your work.
BF: All my personal work is created in a small, little room, in my small, little town house in Huntington Beach.  It is my retreat from the outside world. Apart from my six-year-old daughter who often paints and sketches with me on her own little easel, it is my personal sanctuary where I can relax and meditate on life. My surrounding really doesn’t effect my work very much. My art is more a product of my own inner headspace rather than a product of any outside influence.

AP: What are some of you favorite design projects/exhibitions you have worked on to date.
BF: I have done a shed-load of t-shirt designs, posters, and album covers recently for a handful of rock bands and created some artwork for the R&B star, Keri Hilson (which was fun) but I think that a recent highlight was getting to show some of my work at the FIND Art gallery in Costa Mesa, California, and sharing the stage with some amazing artistic talent, like Jamie Johnson and Edward Frausto. I like the feeling of being part of an artistic community.

AP: What is your medium of choice.
BF: Ink and paper. I also love to work with magic markers and sharpies.

AP: What is the relationship between technique and content in your work.
BF: It really drives the content. Even though I don’t stick firmly to one sort of illustration style, I think the character of my work comes from simple ink lines, mostly done with a mixture of ink pens and ink brushes.  I feel that I have more control over my work when I just use black ink and simple color choices. 

AP: Who are some of the artists that have inspired you and or your work.
BF: New artists I see on a daily basis inspire me. Thanks to the Internet we have what seems like an infinite resource of art to drool over. You only have to look at the Artsprojekt site to see how much talent there is out there.  I just went to the LACMA to see Tim Burton’s artwork that I thought was fabulous, and I’m really influenced by edgy artists like Alex Pardee, but growing up I was most influenced by comic artists such as Simon Bisley and Brian Bolland and by dramatic artists like William Blake and Gustav Klimt. There’s really too many to mention. I love art. I’m pretty much influenced by everything, from the art I see, to the horror movies I watch and from the people I meet.

AP: In what direction would you like to see your work going over the next five years.
BF: I don’t think in those terms. Go with the flow, man! Just do what you like and what feels good and if people like it, then that’s a bonus. I make art for myself, as a form of meditation, I don’t have a plan.

AP: What forth coming projects and or exhibitions do you have scheduled for 2012.
BF: I really don’t have anything planned. Hopefully I’ll be able to get exhibited again at some point and show my work to a wider audience. I’ve also been painting vinyl toys and selling them on eBay. It’s such great fun!  Unfortunately, I find myself limited to the Munny shapes and a few other “paint-your-own” characters available. I’m seriously considering creating molds and starting a line of my own vinyl toys.

AP: Take us on a guided tour through a day in your life as an artist.
BF: I work a 9 to 5 job designing for a marketing company. When I get home, I use my time to draw sketch, or paint as a way of clearing my head of all the driftwood and debris that the day has washed up.  Sometimes I’m working on a freelance project for a band, a t-shirt company, or on a commission, but mostly, I work late into the night on artwork for my own pleasure.
AP: Thank you so much for taking the time to answer our questions.

Artist Proof Interview with Artist: Ben Fellowes

Global Location: Orange County, California

URL:  http://www.benfellowes.com

AP Shop URL: http://www.zazzle.com/benfellowes

Working mainly in black and white, my illustration and graphic work has been used to promote everything from punk rock bands to hair salons. I paint, illustrate, and use digital mediums to create a diversity of artwork.   

boudica

AP: How long have you been making art for and what lead you to start.

BF: For as long as I can remember.  But what made me start wanting to draw was Judge Dredd. I used to read 2000ad (the brilliant comic that starred Judge Dredd) at about the age of seven. I loved the black and white ink artwork that was so “punk rock” and spoke of heroes and justice and future worlds yet to be explored. In fact, one of m y earliest memories was running to the corner shop to buy the latest copy of 2000ad.  I can still remember the way the ink smelled on the page. I relive that same thrill every time I open an ink bottle. It’s funny, but even though I have always had art in my life, I only started taking my own artwork seriously a couple of years ago when I was invited to exhibit a few pieces of my work at a small gallery in Southern California.

photoshop

AP: Where do you currently live and work and how does this influence your work.

BF: I work as a Design and Marketing Manager. I create a lot of creative content that includes blog posts, web designs, and print materials. It forces me to think creatively and conceptually.  Even though my personal artwork and my practical day-to-day design work are very separate, I am always thinking of ideas and concepts. This means that I am very rarely in a non-creative mindset and stuck for something to sketch, doodle, write, or build. I live in Orange County in California but I’m a born ‘n’ bred Englishman and only resettled in the US 10 years ago with my wife who is a native Californian. I think my work reflects my British sense of humor and a certain cool California aesthetic (that’s how I self-publicize myself, anyway!) 

wolf2

AP: Did you have formal training if so what? If your self taught can you tell us what you prefer about being a self taught artist vs having formal training?

BF: I think this question is an odd one because I believe that most artists are “self taught”. When it comes to the fundamentals of art and design, I think that there’s only so much someone can show you. Personally, there have been few moments in my life where I’ve had instructors actually show me what do, I’ve pretty much learned how to draw, paint, and sketch on my own.

In reference to my actual qualifications and training, I have a Degree in Graphic Design & Advertising as well as a Bachelors D degree in Print Journalism.  This training has aided me at times throughout my different career paths, but 

I sometimes wonder how much practical use they were? I was taught the basics of design and learnt how to draw, typeset, and compose a design.  But unfortunately, when I eventually got an industry job, agencies were expecting designers to know how to design with Photoshop and Illustrator! I had to teach myself really quickly how to use those programs to survive as a design professional. Becoming an expert in digital programs has definitely helped me to become (somewhat) successful in my career but I now find myself reverting back to the pen and paper to create my own artwork.  Although I love digital and vector art, and still utilize it often, there’s nothing more satisfying than creating something by hand that that is tangible and physical!

potrait2

AP: Can you tell us about where you make your work is it in your house, a studio etc.. and how it effects your work.

BF: All my personal work is created in a small, little room, in my small, little town house in Huntington Beach.  It is my retreat from the outside world. Apart from my six-year-old daughter who often paints and sketches with me on her own little easel, it is my personal sanctuary where I can relax and meditate on life. My surrounding really doesn’t effect my work very much. My art is more a product of my own inner headspace rather than a product of any outside influence.

seasick1

AP: What are some of you favorite design projects/exhibitions you have worked on to date.

BF: I have done a shed-load of t-shirt designs, posters, and album covers recently for a handful of rock bands and created some artwork for the R&B star, Keri Hilson (which was fun) but I think that a recent highlight was getting to show some of my work at the FIND Art gallery in Costa Mesa, California, and sharing the stage with some amazing artistic talent, like Jamie Johnson and Edward Frausto. I like the feeling of being part of an artistic community.

the_long_arm_of_the_law_poster-228328719238950892

AP: What is your medium of choice.

BF: Ink and paper. I also love to work with magic markers and sharpies.

old_punks_never_die_tshirt-235563474732763780

AP: What is the relationship between technique and content in your work.

BF: It really drives the content. Even though I don’t stick firmly to one sort of illustration style, I think the character of my work comes from simple ink lines, mostly done with a mixture of ink pens and ink brushes.  I feel that I have more control over my work when I just use black ink and simple color choices. 

drown2

AP: Who are some of the artists that have inspired you and or your work.

BF: New artists I see on a daily basis inspire me. Thanks to the Internet we have what seems like an infinite resource of art to drool over. You only have to look at the Artsprojekt site to see how much talent there is out there.  I just went to the LACMA to see Tim Burton’s artwork that I thought was fabulous, and I’m really influenced by edgy artists like Alex Pardee, but growing up I was most influenced by comic artists such as Simon Bisley and Brian Bolland and by dramatic artists like William Blake and Gustav Klimt. There’s really too many to mention. I love art. I’m pretty much influenced by everything, from the art I see, to the horror movies I watch and from the people I meet.

to_sleep_to_dream_mousepad-144751694470937552

AP: In what direction would you like to see your work going over the next five years.

BF: I don’t think in those terms. Go with the flow, man! Just do what you like and what feels good and if people like it, then that’s a bonus. I make art for myself, as a form of meditation, I don’t have a plan.

DRAGON

AP: What forth coming projects and or exhibitions do you have scheduled for 2012.

BF: I really don’t have anything planned. Hopefully I’ll be able to get exhibited again at some point and show my work to a wider audience. I’ve also been painting vinyl toys and selling them on eBay. It’s such great fun!  Unfortunately, I find myself limited to the Munny shapes and a few other “paint-your-own” characters available. I’m seriously considering creating molds and starting a line of my own vinyl toys.

hooligan

AP: Take us on a guided tour through a day in your life as an artist.

BF: I work a 9 to 5 job designing for a marketing company. When I get home, I use my time to draw sketch, or paint as a way of clearing my head of all the driftwood and debris that the day has washed up.  Sometimes I’m working on a freelance project for a band, a t-shirt company, or on a commission, but mostly, I work late into the night on artwork for my own pleasure.

AP: Thank you so much for taking the time to answer our questions.


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